Sheathing Roof and Walls

This stage of the build makes a big visual and structural change to the tiny house. Not only does the appearance become more solid as the framing is covered, but the entire structure becomes completely rigid. No longer does the 2×4 framing creak when moving around in the lofts.

The plywood goes up fairly quickly depending on the details of the cuts. In most cases my Dad and I were able to get two sheets of plywood up each evening after work. This really helped to speed along the building process by chipping away at it daily instead of waiting for the weekend.

My Dad standing over the 30 sheets of 5-ply 5/8" plywood

My Dad standing over the 30 sheets of 5-ply 5/8″ plywood

I brought the plywood home in a borrowed truck

I brought the plywood home in a borrowed truck

I chose to use 5/8″ 5-ply plywood for everything including subfloor, roof and walls. The extra weight was acceptable on my upgraded trailer. The extra cost was less than $3 per sheet compared to the 1/2″ plywood. The quality was significantly better than the selection of 1/2″ plywood. And finally, the added strength was worth the added weight and cost.

Gable roof sheathed

Dormer and one gable roof sheathed

First plywood up on the walls

First plywood up on the walls

Each sheet of plywood is glued and fastened with 2-1/4″ galvanized ring-shank nails.

Back of Arborion is sheathed

Back of Arborion is sheathed

Back of Arborion is sheathed

Back of Arborion is sheathed

I used blue painters tape to mark the positions of the studs, then chalk lines once the plywood was in place. This made nailing into the framing much easier.

Back of the house from the inside

Back of the house from the inside

Plywood extends above dormer wall seems foe extra strength

Plywood extends above dormer wall seems for extra strength

Notching at the gable facia returns

Notching at the gable facia returns

Cutouts around the wheel wells

Cutouts around the wheel wells

I created a simple cardboard template which helped with this step.

The plywood goes up fairly quickly

The plywood goes up fairly quickly

A stack of plywood falls creating a M.C. Escher-like shape out of a fiberglass latter

A stack of plywood falls by accident creating a M.C. Escher-like shape out of a fiberglass ladder

Luckily, no one was hurt. The ladder was a little bent out of shape, but still usable.

Sleeping loft

Sleeping loft

Fully sheathed back

Fully sheathed back

Fully sheathed front

Fully sheathed front

Fully sheathed

Fully sheathed

I now have a finely crafted, labor intensive plywood box on wheels.

Next on the to-do list: roofing.

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Categories: Tiny Home: Arborion | Tags: , , , , , , | 2 Comments

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2 thoughts on “Sheathing Roof and Walls

  1. Wow! Arborion is looking good! I agree that quality is important, even if the weight is a little more.

  2. Thank you Linda. How’s your tiny house coming along? I have not seen an update for several weeks.

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