Learning Curves and Flexible Pipes

This step of the tiny house build involved an enormous amount of research. I had never before roughed in plumbing, electrical or propane and now I was going to tackle all three. Since each of these systems was to be permanently sealed up inside the walls I had to be sure I knew what I was getting myself into. Searching for what I thought to be the very best of each system for my needs and the space available, I invested countless hours getting advice from professionals in the trade, watching you tube how-to videos, product demonstrations, online browsing/shopping and visiting home improvement and specialty stores. It was a huge learning curve.

Plumbing

I kept all the plumbing in one corner of the tiny house which made things simpler. This includes a kitchen sink, shower/tub, and bathroom sink. The water lines had to be tough and yet flexible since I wanted the entire run of each pipe to be without joints in the walls. This is just one less thing to worry about going wrong inside the walls years down the road. For these reasons I chose to use the Uponor Pro Pex. My cousin, Russell, a general contractor and draftsman, highly recommended I use this product as well. It does not use the crimp rings like other pex styles. Instead it uses expandable pex couplings that contract around the pipe and fitting for a very secure and long-lasting bond. More on this system when I get to the finish plumbing.

Pro Pex

Pro Pex

Shower plumbing

Shower plumbing

Electrical

This was the most labor intensive of the rough ins, but in my opinion it was also the easiest. The wire had to be run through the walls to every corner and in the lofts, but careful planning made that task easy and fun. I used standard 12/2 Romex-type wire for all connections. There are a total of six circuits inside the tiny house and one in the utility annex in case I want to power something outside. Each circuit is on a 20 amp breaker. The six inside circuits are divided according to load. The outlets near the ac unit and toaster oven are on there own circuits.

Driiling a hole for the wires to enter the utility annex

Driiling a hole for the wires to enter the utility annex

Dad drilling holes to run the wires

Dad drilling holes to run the wires

Tricky corner threading

Tricky corner threading

Running the wires

Running the wires

Sleeping loft

Sleeping loft

Propane

My propane requirements were similar to the plumbing.  I needed two continuous lines each run to either side of the tiny house. One will supply a double gas range top in the kitchen and the other for a possible future heater. Since I did not want any fittings inside the walls I went with Home Flex stainless steel flexible line. Bending it through holes in the corners of the tiny house was a challenge, but it worked.

Kitchen wall

Kitchen wall

Propane termination flanges in utility annex

Propane termination flanges in utility annex

In the end I feel I learned so much and made some really great choices. These choices were not cheap, but since it will be sealed up in the walls, and buried permanently in closed-cell spray foam, I wanted the confidence of knowing I assembled everything to the best of my ability. Everything is now in place for the spray-in insulation.

Advertisements
Categories: Tiny Home: Arborion | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Post navigation

2 thoughts on “Learning Curves and Flexible Pipes

  1. Closer!

  2. One inch at a time, but in a tiny house every inch counts.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: